FOUNDING INVESTIGATORS

PROF MICHAEL B.BRENNER

PROF MICHAEL B.BRENNER
Elizabeth Fay Brigham, Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School.
Director, Cell and Molecular Immunology, Division of Rheumatology, Inflammation and Immunity Brigham and Women’s Hospital Boston, MA. USA
Michael Brenner is the Brigham Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Director of the Human Immunology Center at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston. He is co-chair of the NIH-FNIH RA/SLE Accelerating Medicines Partnership (AMP) consortium. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, USA, Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology and Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received the Lee C. Howley Prize for Research in Arthritis (Arthritis Foundation), the Distinguished Basic Investigator Award (American College of Rheumatology) and the Carol-Nachman Prize in Rheumatology. Michael’s laboratory, and The Human Immunology Center he leads, design and implement high dimensional immunophenotyping, single cell transcriptomic analyses and functional studies to deconstruct human autoimmune disorders. Using a combination of single cell technologies and functional models, his current work is defining new stromal subsets, their roles in synovial pathology, and how to target them therapeutically.

Prof David A. Tuveson

Prof David A. Tuveson
Director of the Cancer Center and the Roy J. Zuckerberg Professor of Cancer Research at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.
Chief Scientist at the Lustgarten Foundation and President of AACR
David obtained a bachelors degree in chemistry at M.I.T., followed by M.D. and Ph.D. degrees at Johns Hopkins. He was a medical resident at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and a medical oncology fellow at Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center. During his post-doctoral years in Boston, David co-developed KIT inhibitors for gastrointestinal stromal tumors with Dr George Demetri. Simultaneously, he generated several widely-used mouse cancer models with Dr Tyler Jacks. As an independent investigator, David’s lab developed the first mouse models of ductal pancreatic cancer at the University of Pennsylvania. Subsequently, he was recruited to the University of Cambridge, UK, where his lab identified poor drug delivery as a barrier for therapeutic efficacy in pancreatic cancer. He was then recruited to Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) as the Deputy Director of the Cancer Center and to serve as Director of Research for the Lustgarten Foundation. At CSHL, his lab co-developed pancreatic organoid cancer models with Prof. Dr Hans Clevers, and made a series of observations regarding cancer fibroblasts, redox regulation, and pancreatitis. His awards include the Rita Allen Scholarship and the Jan Waldenström Award, and the Hamdan Award.

Prof Chris Buckley

Prof Chris Buckley
Kennedy Professor of Translational Rheumatology at the Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, University of Oxford.
Director of NIHR Infrastructure for Birmingham Health Partners
Chris obtained a degree in Biochemistry from the University of Oxford with subsequent undergraduate training in Medicine (MBBS) at the Royal Free Hospital, London. His postgraduate medical training was in General Medicine and Rheumatology at the Hammersmith Hospital, London, and John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford. Chris obtained a DPhil at the Institute Molecular Medicine, Oxford. He subsequently joined the Department of Rheumatology in Birmingham, was awarded an MRC Senior Clinical Fellowship and in 2002 became Arthritis Research UK Professor of Rheumatology. In 2012 he was appointed Director of the Birmingham NIHR Clinical Research Facility. In May 2017 Chris took up a new joint academic post between the Universities of Birmingham and Oxford as Director of Clinical Research at the Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology Oxford and Director of NIHR Infrastructure in Birmingham for Birmingham Health Partners to Direct the Arthritis Therapy Acceleration Programme (A-TAP).

Prof Soumya Raychaudhuri

Prof Soumya Raychaudhuri
Professor of Medicine & Biomedical Informatics, Harvard Medical School
Soumya serves as the Director for the Center for Data Sciences at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) and Harvard Medical School and is appointed as an Institute Member at the Broad Institute. Additionally, he is clinically active and sees patients at the BWH Arthritis Center. After completing his MD/PhD at Stanford University, Soumya pursued clinical training in internal medicine, and then went on to pursue subspecialty training in rheumatology at BWH. He concurrently completed postdoctoral training in human genetics at the Broad Institute with Dr. Mark Daly. Since joining the faculty at Harvard Medical School in 2010, he has contributed to the understanding of the genetic basis of rheumatoid arthritis and other immune-mediated diseases. He has also been at the forefront of devising statistical and computational methods to localize genetic association signals to causal variants, and to interpret human genetic data in the context of functional information. He currently has active research programs in the human genetics and functional genomics of a wide range of human diseases including rheumatoid arthritis. He has been striving to define the key cell-states and their function driving inflammation in these diseases, including the inflammatory fibroblast.

Prof Mark Coles

Prof Mark Coles
Kennedy Professor of Immunology, Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Sciences and Official Fellow Reuben College, University of Oxford
Mark graduated with a BSc (Honors and Distinction) in microbiology from Cornell University (NY, USA) in 1992. He then went on to complete his PhD in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley with Prof. David Raulet. His research focused on Natural Killer cell receptor expression and function on T lymphocytes (NKT and CD8 T-cells). He undertook postdoctoral training with Prof. Dimitris Kioussis at the National Institute of Medical Research, London, investigating mechanisms leading to lymph node and thymus formation and function. In 2006 he moved as a lecturer to the Centre for Immunology and Infection at the University of York focusing on stromal immunology to identify stromal cell formation and function in human and murine lymph nodes and tertiary lymphoid tissue using fluorescent lineage reporters. In 2017 he moved from the University of York to the Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology where his groups use interdisciplinary approaches from single molecule imaging to multi-scale computational modelling to identify novel methods to therapeutically target immune mediated inflammatory disease with a specific focus on stromal immunology. He co-directs the Oxford Mathematical Immunology Group focusing on tissue pharmacology and immmuno-physiology in cancer and inflammatory disease. He works closely with Prof. Christopher Buckley to support the Arthritis Therapy Acceleration Program (A-TAP).